Joan Jett and The Blackhearts Bad Reputation Nation

March 2016 News

Page updated on March 31, 2016
All news is attributed to the source from which it was received so that readers may judge the validity of the statements for themselves.

Have Joan Jett news to report? Email us at jettfc@aol.com, and please include the source of the information so it can be validated.



Female rockers get the arena shaking
from: winnipegfreepress.com

low resolution image Not Enlargeable Jett, BLACKHEARTS along with Heart impress

It was the biggest cheer heard for a Jett at the MTS Centre in months.

And why not? On Thursday night, JOAN JETT AND THE BLACKHEARTS put their feet to the floor with a take-no-prisoners set fans of the this season's subpar Winnipeg Jets can only dream of.

JOAN JETT AND THE BLACKHEARTS deliver a take-no-prisoners set for Winnipeg fans Thursday night.

The newly inducted Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Famer was the semi-windup of a female-focused hard-rock show with fellow Hall of Famers Heart, who were inducted in 2013. Jett provided a 50-minute career retrospective, getting the crowd revved up with a pair of songs from her days with the RUNAWAYS, Bad Reputation and Cherry Bomb.

Jett was in perfect punk mode, grinding away on her beat-up six-string while dressed head to toe in skin-tight black leather.

Her version of Do You Want to Touch Me had the crowd joining in, and the diminutive singer crouched and inspected her loyal troops in the audience, and later offered her approval of their spirit.

[more]


JOAN JETT in concert Wednesday in Saskatoon
from: youtube.com




JOAN JETT, Heart deadly combo on tour
from: calgarysun.com

low resolution image Not Enlargeable They may both be in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, but JOAN JETT and Heart don't belong in a museum. On Wednesday night in Saskatoon, they proved they belong on stage.

The Queens of Sheba Tour pairs the rock legends, a deadly combo responsible for some of the most enduring songs of the 20th century.

Jett took the stage with little fanfare. No smoke, no explosions, just a band starting its show. She introduced the set by saying "We're the BLACKHEARTS from New York City." She is, of course, the star attraction but she's cool enough to share the spotlight with her four bandmates.

Jett started her set with a double shot of hits, Bad Reputation and the RUNAWAYS hit Cherry Bomb. Her voice has a few extra rasps but they only give her extra rock star cred.

Forty years into her career Jett is still the coolest person in any room. She continues to carry the torch for female rockers with her bad ass vocals and battered Gibson Melody Maker.

The 13-song set list ranged from newer tunes like 2013's Make It Back to the very first song she ever wrote You Drove Me Wild, another RUNAWAYS tune. Lesser known songs like The Light of Day (penned by Bruce Springsteen and featured in the Jett/Michael J. Fox movie of the same name) and Any Weather (which she wrote with Dave Grohl) gave the set some depth.

[more]


There's a reason these women are hall-of-famers
from: calgarysun.com

low resolution image Not Enlargeable A double bill of recent Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame royalty was an early spring fling for a capacity crowd of rockers, old and new-ish, Monday evening at the fabulous Southern Jubilee Auditorium.

Heart's human siren, Ann Wilson, her guitar-toting sister, Nancy, and a legendary Runaway have been inspiring women in rock since the '70s. All combined, the troika have broken down every barrier to the extent that no one even uses the term "women in rock" anymore.

Inexplicably, 65-year-old Ann's voice seems only to get stronger with each successive visit to these parts. She's sometimes referred to as the female Robert Plant, but maybe the Golden God of rock and roll is the male Ann Wilson.

Following the brash, high-energy punk and roll of JOAN JETT is never easy, but Heart was up to the task - and then some.

From the opening strains of Magic Man from the 1976 landmark Dreamboat Annie album, which quickly segued into Heartless from Magazine (1977), Ann had jaws on the floor with her ferocious vocal power and control. Looking trim, fit and fantastic in blue and black, indeed, she would rule the night like very few can.

But the group collective also meant business while knocking out one timeless rock classic after another. Ann killed it through What About Love (she even makes the 80s-era softballs sound spectacular), while Nancy then belted out a nifty lead during Straight On from '78s Dog And Butterfly before taking the mic for a lead vocal on the syrupy mega hit, These Dreams.

[more]


REVIEW: Heart & JOAN JETT deliver pure, unadulterated rock 'n' roll at the Jubilee Auditorium
from: alaskahighwaynews.ca

low resolution image Not Enlargeable It's a mystery why Heart decided to end its show at the Jubilee Auditorium in Edmonton on Sunday night with three Led Zeppelin songs. Much appreciated, but weird. Maybe because Ann Wilson is the female Robert Plant? She sure can hit those high notes - at the age of 65.

It's not like Heart doesn't have enough songs of their own.

So does the co-headliner JOAN JETT. She and her BLACKHEARTS didn't do any covers, just the songs that people wanted to hear: Bad Reputation, I Hate Myself for Loving You, Do You Wanna Touch Me?, simple, solid, three chord, three minute rock songs that speak from an assertive woman's perspective. I Love Rock ‘n' Roll, a tale of seducing a 17-year-old boy by a jukebox when jukeboxes accepted dimes, and there were actually jukeboxes, was a little more Mrs. Robinson than when it came out, but the hit of former teen dreams had no less impact on this crowd. JOAN JETT remains true to form: punk but not too punk, sings pop songs that are dressed in leather and swagger, and has a great voice still in fine form - at the age of 57.

These women are calling themselves the "Queens of Sheba" for this tour, and no one's going to argue with one of the highest concentrations of rock chick power ever seen in one place.

Heart NancyHeart, meanwhile, could've turned into a pure nostalgia schtick filled with safe balladry like What About Love and These Dreams were it not for a few interesting wrinkles. Figuratively speaking. Like the cool Zeppelin covers. Ann wailed her guts out on The Immigrant Song, experimented with electronic stank on the obscure No Quarter, and brought the house down with a very Heart-like rendition of Misty Mountain Hop that she made her own. What?! No Stairway to Heaven? Heart got a huge boost after they performed the song at the Kennedy Center Honors in 2012, and Robert Plant himself was reportedly so moved that he wept. Sadly, audiences on the Queens of Sheba tour are denied Stairway to Heaven. Maybe they don't want to turn into the world's greatest female Led Zeppelin cover band.

[more]


REVIEW: Heart & JOAN JETT deliver pure, unadulterated rock 'n' roll at the Jubilee Auditorium
from: edmontonsun.com

low resolution image Not Enlargeable It's a mystery why Heart decided to end its show at the Jubilee Auditorium in Edmonton on Sunday night with three Led Zeppelin songs. Much appreciated, but weird. Maybe because Ann Wilson is the female Robert Plant? She sure can hit those high notes - at the age of 65.

It's not like Heart doesn't have enough songs of their own.

So does the co-headliner JOAN JETT. She and her BLACKHEARTS didn't do any covers, just the songs that people wanted to hear: Bad Reputation, I Hate Myself for Loving You, Do You Wanna Touch Me?, simple, solid, three chord, three minute rock songs that speak from an assertive woman's perspective. I Love Rock ‘n' Roll, a tale of seducing a 17-year-old boy by a jukebox when jukeboxes accepted dimes, and there were actually jukeboxes, was a little more Mrs. Robinson than when it came out, but the hit of former teen dreams had no less impact on this crowd. JOAN JETT remains true to form: punk but not too punk, sings pop songs that are dressed in leather and swagger, and has a great voice still in fine form - at the age of 57.

These women are calling themselves the "Queens of Sheba" for this tour, and no one's going to argue with one of the highest concentrations of rock chick power ever seen in one place.

Heart NancyHeart, meanwhile, could've turned into a pure nostalgia schtick filled with safe balladry like What About Love and These Dreams were it not for a few interesting wrinkles. Figuratively speaking. Like the cool Zeppelin covers. Ann wailed her guts out on The Immigrant Song, experimented with electronic stank on the obscure No Quarter, and brought the house down with a very Heart-like rendition of Misty Mountain Hop that she made her own. What?! No Stairway to Heaven? Heart got a huge boost after they performed the song at the Kennedy Center Honors in 2012, and Robert Plant himself was reportedly so moved that he wept. Sadly, audiences on the Queens of Sheba tour are denied Stairway to Heaven. Maybe they don't want to turn into the world's greatest female Led Zeppelin cover band.

[more]


Queens of Sheba also Queens of Rock
from: gigcity.ca

low resolution image Not Enlargeable It’s a mystery why Heart decided to end its show at the Jubilee Auditorium in Edmonton on Sunday night with three Led Zeppelin songs. Much appreciated, but weird. Maybe because Ann Wilson is the female Robert Plant? She sure can hit those high notes â€" at the age of 65.

It’s not like Heart doesn’t have enough songs of their own.

So does the co-headliner JOAN JETT. She and her BLACKHEARTS didn’t do any covers, just the songs that people wanted to hear: Bad Reputation, I Hate Myself for Loving You, Do You Wanna Touch Me?, simple, solid, three chord, three minute rock songs that speak from an assertive woman’s perspective. I Love Rock ‘n’ Roll, a tale of seducing a 17-year-old boy by a jukebox when jukeboxes accepted dimes, and there were actually jukeboxes, was a little more Mrs. Robinson than when it came out, but the hit of former teen dreams had no less impact on this crowd. JOAN JETT remains true to form: punk but not too punk, sings pop songs that are dressed in leather and swagger, and has a great voice still in fine form â€" at the age of 57.

These women are calling themselves the “Queens of Sheba” for this tour, and no one’s going to argue with one of the highest concentrations of rock chick power ever seen in one place.

Heart NancyHeart, meanwhile, could’ve turned into a pure nostalgia schtick filled with safe balladry like What About Love and These Dreams were it not for a few interesting wrinkles. Figuratively speaking. Like the cool Zeppelin covers. Ann wailed her guts out on The Immigrant Song, experimented with electronic stank on the obscure No Quarter, and brought the house down with a very Heart-like rendition of Misty Mountain Hop that she made her own. What?! No Stairway to Heaven? Heart got a huge boost after they performed the song at the Kennedy Center Honors in 2012, and Robert Plant himself was reportedly so moved that he wept. Sadly, audiences on the Queens of Sheba tour are denied Stairway to Heaven. Maybe they don’t want to turn into the world’s greatest female Led Zeppelin cover band.

[more]


JOAN JETT Reveals How the Who Helped Launch Her Solo Career
from: RollingStone.com

low resolution image Not Enlargeable Band's act of generosity led to Jett's breakthrough 'Bad Reputation' album The Who are currently trekking across North America on their "The Who Hits 50!" tour, which Roger Daltrey has described as the beginning of the group's "long goodbye." The band has influenced countless musicians who have followed in its footsteps, including Rock and Roll Hall of Famer JOAN JETT, who shares her love for the Who below.

I first heard the Who on FM radio as a kid. "Powerful" would be the first word to come to mind to describe their music. Pete Townshend was definitely one of the guys that made me want to play guitar. I wanted to make those sounds, and I asked my parents for an electric guitar for Christmas and they actually got it for me. So I was able to sit around my room and play the simpler songs like "My Generation" and some "Won't Get Fooled Again."

We've gone onstage to "Won't Get Fooled Again" in the past. I think one key that song hit on for me personally was the underdog thing - of people pulling one over on you, and how that's not going to happen again. And you know, "Meet the new boss, same as the old boss" - you have to live a little bit of life before you know that that's a truism. Words like that are very powerful-feeling, and I think it really resonates inside and helps me warm up vocals to sing and scream. But we could've easily gone on to a lot of different songs of theirs. The era around "Won't Get Fooled Again" is locked in my brain, but I love things on the Tommy album. "See Me, Feel Me, Touch Me," all that stuff, I think it's beautiful, beautiful music.

I feel sort of nurtured by the Who. At the end of the RUNAWAYS, I was alone, trying to make my way in the world, and I'd just met Kenny [Laguna, Jett's longtime producer], and he had this idea to go over to the Who's Ramport Studios and record there, because he had been working there with the Who for several years. After a week or two, we were getting the pressure from my manager to sign this record deal. One day, Pete Townshend dropped by Kenny's apartment. I happened to be asleep at the time. Kenny spoke to Pete about this record deal, and Pete said it seemed shady. He told us to talk to his manager, Bill Curbishley, because we were in their studio and worried about paying them. Bill just said, "Do what you got to do, and pay us when you can." I thought it was so generous and wonderful. We were able to pay him back obviously. The Who let us do Bad Reputation in their studios. I had something to play for people. So, to me, it all starts right there with the Who.

About three years or so after making Bad Reputation in the studio, we opened for the Who. I remember, Roger got down on one knee and sang to me happy birthday to me backstage. I saw Roger recently at his Teen Cancer America concert. He asked me to sing "Summertime Blues," which was pretty scary. I just blanked out. I could not remember the words. You look over and you see Roger, and you still get star-struck. It's still tough to hang with those guys sometimes. It's pretty intense.

To me, the Who's songs stand for fun, but it's fun music that has substance to it. It's talking about more than just partying. Partying songs are great, too, but I think it's good when you've got messages in there as well. They're raucous, and they've got meaning. It's everything you want to be if you're a rock band.



JOAN JETT talks about her mark on rock n' roll
from: torontosun.com

low resolution image Not Enlargeable JOAN JETT has only ever known how to rock one way - her way - inspiring a legion of like-minded fans. And while that has meant some slammed doors for the 57-year-old singer-songwriter-guitarist, she has lasted four-plus decades: first with The RUNAWAYS and their hit Cherry Bomb and later with her band the BLACKHEARTS who enjoyed success with their covers of I Love Rock 'N' Roll and Crimson and Clover plus originals I Hate Myself For Loving You.

"I knew that all of us (early) women (rockers) were inspiring people but it was tough to feel that outside of playing a show," said Jett.

"Because you took so much crap in other areas, whether it was in the press, certainly in my case, a lot of difficulties getting records deals. and that was kind of a blessing in disguise because nobody wanted to sign me so we wound up owning all our own stuff."

Most recently, Jett & the BLACKHEARTS are touring Canada in March with fellow '70s female rock pioneers Heart.

We caught up with Jett at a tour stop in Prince George, B.C., to talk about being an early female rock hero, along with Heart's Ann and Nancy Wilson, her 2015 Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame induction and what's next.

"I'm sure every woman and girl who has gone through this has their own story of how people didn't believe in them or how people belittled them," said Jett. "But on the other hand you had just as many people who were supportive... so that was great to see I think from men who were a little more secure in their own selves, at least in my case, then they were able to appreciate a woman because they weren't threatened by what we did."

Are the Canadian fans treating you guys well?
Very well. It's been a blast. And the audiences have been great. Everyone's been really friendly. It's been awesome.

I take it you've known Heart for a long time?
Through the years [Heart and I] have played together several times. We kind of know each other. And I think it's been a great pairing. And it seems as if the audiences are loving it. So I'm real happy about it. And I remember Heart too when I was in The RUNAWAYS and we were starting to play and having hits saying 'That's who we want to be someday.'

[more]


THE IMPORTANCE OF JOAN JETT: FEMINIST ICON
from: vcelebmix.com

low resolution image Not Enlargeable Maybe you don't know her, maybe you've only heard her name, but if you're a fan of classic rock music, you definitely know who she is. JOAN JETT is on of the most iconic women in music history, a creator of many rock anthems, and a fabulous musician. She's even been named the best female guitarist ever.

That's not all, as a girl who fought to built her career as a female rockstar in the 70's, she was then and still is today, feminist role model that many girls look up to. There are a number of reasons why she's embodied the role of a feminist icon and for International Women's Day we wanted to focus on a few of them.

"Being told that girls can't play rock 'n' roll-I mean, even as a kid, it was so illogical to me-it's like, what do you mean? That girls can't master the instruments? I'm in school with girls playing cello and violin and Beethoven and Bach. You don't mean they can't master the instrument. What you mean is they're not allowed, socially-it's a societal thing." -JOAN JETT to Interview Magazine, 2010.

3. She made a name for herself in a man's world.
Joan Marie Larkin was born in 1958 in the U.S. and lived her childhood in a world already taken by The Beatles and The Rolling Stones. Some believed that girls had zero chances of making it big in the rock industry. Only a few women had the guts to take an instrument and step on a stage and one of them was Suzi Quatro, Joan's biggest idol. She knew that's what she wanted to do, so she took a guitar at age 14 and started taking lessons. However, after her teacher ignored her petition to learn how to play rock and roll, because she said a woman couldn't play electric guitar as good as a man, Joan quit.

By that time there were already some rock bands that included women in their formation, but Joan wanted more. She held onto her electric guitar and started the biggest all-girl rockband: The RUNAWAYS. Made up of Sandy West, Jackie Fox, Lita Ford, and Cherie Currie, Joan and The RUNAWAYS quickly made a name for themselves. After Cherrie left the band, Joan took the lead for two years before The RUNAWAYS split up.

"The RUNAWAYS was so special to me and meant so much, beyond just girls playing rock 'n' roll. I think it represented a lot to me about following your dreams, about not being dictated to about what your life is going to be. Girls see these defined roles they're supposed to follow in life, but when I was a young child, my parents told me I could be anything."

[more]


Review: Queens of rock Heart and JOAN JETT shake up Vancouver
from: vancouversun.com

low resolution image Not Enlargeable Heart with JOAN JETT AND THE BLACKHEARTS
March 8 | Orpheum Theatre
VANCOUVER - "Hello world, I'm your wild girl!"

JOAN JETT still hits with the explosive energy of a firecracker flushed down a high school lavatory.

Her rock can still splinter porcelain, crack mirrors and send the whole room gushing with reckless energy, and four decades after her first band The RUNAWAYS lit their first Cherry Bomb, Jett is still up on stage, clad in a polka-dot leather bodysuit, black hair and red lipstick, bashing a guitar adorned with punk rock stickers and countless pick scratches.

The Queens of Rock - in this case the Queens of Sheba - made the Orpheum their lair Tuesday night in Vancouver, Jett and her band The BLACKHEARTS teaming up with sisters Ann and Nancy Wilson of Heart for a rock and roll spectacular that drew out a sold-out crowd.

Backed by her four-piece outfit, Jett pumped out her New York City-bred punk 'n' roll fast and tight, her snarly vocals driving classic cuts like I Love Rock 'n' Roll and Bad Reputation as well as newer material like Fragile and Any Weather, a song recorded at Dave Grohl's Studio 606, from her 2013 album Unvarnished.

[more]


Lessons Learned From 11 Of The Fiercest Women In Rock
from: musicfeeds.com.au

low resolution image Not Enlargeable Today is International Women's Day and what better way to mark the occasion than paying homage to some of rock and roll's most influential and fierce female artists.

Let's not waste any time here.

Patti Smith
The archetypal strong woman in rock'n'roll, Patti Smith has been an permanent presence within music since 1975 debut Horses. While never actively part of the feminist movement herself, as she was in her own words "more concerned with my own mental pursuits", she has nevertheless inspired many young women with her zero fucks attitude toward femininity â€" best summed up by the following quote about her personal style. "My style says, ‘Look at me, don't look at me.'"

Lauryn Hill
While some might argue that as she started out with The Fugees, Lauryn Hill is more of a hip hop than a rock'n'roll artist, I would counter that her solo work draws as much from the tradition of rock as it does from hip hop. However while her solo work is plenty full of powerful lyrics on womanhood and femininity, nothing encapsulates her boss, no shit taking qualities than the iconic final lines of her verse on The Fugees' hit Ready Or Not.

"So while you're imitating Al Capone / I'll be Nina Simone / And defecating on your microphone."

Brittany Howard
Lead singer/guitarist of southern rock powerhouse Alabama Shakes, Brittany Howard has a reputation as a fierce and soul-baring vocalist and live performer.

[more]


Heart, JOAN JETT, Cheap Trick to play Iowa State Fair
from: desmoinesregister.com

low resolution image Not Enlargeable Get your hair spray ready because Heart, Cheap Trick and JOAN JETT AND THE BLACKHEARTS will perform at the Iowa State Fair.

The bands will play starting at 8 p.m. August 16 and tickets, which will range in price from $32-$52, will go on sale at 10 a.m. March 26.

All three acts have been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame - Chicago's Cheap Trick being the most recent as a 2016 inductee. Heart found success in the '70s and '80s with hits such as "Magic Man" and "Nothin' At All."

JOAN JETT's known for her monster rock hits "I Love Rock 'n' Roll" and "Bad Reputation." Cheap Trick are set to release a new studio album, "Bang, Zoom, Crazy...Hello," on April 1. The show at the Grandstand is part of the "Rock Hall Three For All" tour featuring all three groups.

Heart, Cheap Trick and JOAN JETT will join other 2016 Iowa State Fair Grandstand Acts previously announced, including Jeff Dunham, Jason Derulo, Dierks Bentley and Brett Eldredge.

The Iowa State Fair plans to stagger when tickets go on sale for all Grandstand shows from February through May, instead of having a one-time on-sale date in April.



10 women you totally forgot were from the Philly area
from: phillyvoice.com

low resolution image Not Enlargeable March is Women's History Month, and the Philadelphia area has plenty of women to celebrate. The City of Brotherly Love and Sisterly Affection and the surrounding region have produced many influential women, from artists and authors to attorneys and all-star athletes.

Of course, you already know Philly's ties to Grace Kelly, Jill Scott, Gloria Allred, Eve, Pink, Jazmine Sullivan, Tina Fey, Katherine Drexel and even Betsy Ross. That's because when Philly can make a claim to fame, it holds on tight. (See: obsessing over anything Reading-born Taylor Swift does in the state of Pennsylvania.)

But there are even more famous women who mark Greater Philadelphia as where they got their start -- whether they literally started their life in one of the local hospitals or spent their formative years in the area. Take a look at the list below and then remember to say "they're from my town" every time you see them, in perpetuity.

Yes, really: Famous "Little Women" author Louisa May Alcott was born in Germantown in 1832. She and her family moved to Massachusetts while Alcott was a very young child, and she grew up there, but she took some signature Philly 'tude with her. Beginning with her first book at 22, Alcott made a name for herself in the male-dominated writing world, publishing more than 30 books during her lifetime.

Known for roles in hit films and TV shows like "A History of Violence," "The Jane Austen Book Club," "Coyote Ugly" and "ER," Norristown native Maria Bello has seen her star rise since discovering her love of acting at Villanova University. When she famously penned the 2013 New York Times essay “Coming Out as a Modern Family,” about explaining to her son how she fell in love with her female best friend, she welcomed even more fans and has since released a book about labels and identity.

[more]
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